Vintage overdye

We get requests pretty much daily for “vintage reloaded” or overdyed carpets. We have taken a decision not to keep them. “Why?” you may ask. For 2 reasons.

Firstly, they are utterly impractical for the floor and have a very, very short lifespan. Within 5 years they will have degraded to the point of falling apart. The process they use to strip the pile is very, very damaging. The rug is shaved and scrubbed, exposing the foundation of the carpet – its warp and weft, which means you are walking directly on the fragile foundation of the carpet with no cushioning to protect it from the friction of wear. Then it is bleached, using an “acid wash”, which will further weaken the warp and weft. Then it is overdyed, which is a process that they cant properly “fix” so the colour will never be properly set – it may stain floors beneath it, especiually if it gets wet. Also, there is no way to properly wash them – spot washing will cause dye in the spot to lift and it cant be fully wet washed or the dye will wash away. We don’t want customers to feel cheated when these – very expensive – carpets fall apart. We have prided ourselves on quality and good service and if we sold a rug that fell apart in a few years and couldn’t be properly washed without losing all its colour, we know our customers would lose faith in us, and our reputation, built up over 27 years – is too important for us to risk by selling these low quality rugs, and especially as they are so expensive.

Chobe, green

Monday, 15 December 2014 by
Green Chobe

These rugs were originally woven according to the specifications of western designers, who prescribed subtle colours, textures and designs. They have evolved into a beautiful transitional art form of their own, usually in soft colours. A good chobe should be a vegetable dye on glossy, good quality wool. Takes medium to high traffic. Carpet, rug.

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